What is diabetic retinopathy?

Monday, January 27 2014 - 0 comments

What is diabetic retinopathy?

Diabetes can lead to numerous health problems. Diabetic retinopathy is an eye condition that may result from diabetes, and the National Eye Institute estimates 40 to 45 percent of all Americans with diabetes suffer from some form of it. What is diabetic retinopathy? High blood glucose levels can cause the tiny blood vessels in the back of the eye to swell, leak or become blocked, cutting off nourishment to the retina. If blood flow to the retina is lost, it can result in vision loss. In some cases, the body responds by signaling the production of more blood vessels. Unfortunately, these new blood...

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Diabetes: Leading cause of blindness

Tuesday, November 05 2013 - 0 comments

Diabetes: Leading cause of blindness

Diabetes: Leading cause of blindness Diabetic retinopathy is an eye condition caused by diabetes in which the retina is damaged by leaky blood vessels. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can lead to irreversible blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of retinal blindness in the world. Approximately 26 million men, women and children in the United States have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. About 25 percent of diabetics have some form of diabetic retinopathy and five percent have a serious case of the condition. The longer a patient has had diabetes, the greater his or her chances...

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November is American Diabetes Month

Monday, November 04 2013 - 1 comments

November is American Diabetes Month

The American Diabetes Association has designated November as American Diabetes Month to raise awareness about this life-threatening illness. Nearly 26 million men, women and children in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes and another 79 million are at risk for developing type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes can lead to serious eye conditions , including diabetic retinopathy and cataracts. According to the National Institute of Health, diabetes is a leading cause of blindness in adults ages 20 to 64 . Keeping up with regular eye exams can detect early changes in the eyes due to a disease caused...

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How to prevent or treat diabetic retinopathy

Monday, May 20 2013 - 0 comments

Diabetic retinopathy is a common eye disease affecting an estimated 40 to 45 percent of diabetics in the U.S. This eye condition causes tiny blood vessels that carry blood and nutrients to the retina to swell, leak or even become blocked. When the vessels become blocked, new blood vessels may develop. These vessels are very fragile and can leak blood into the back of the eye, damaging the eye and even causing vision loss or blindness. Preventing diabetic retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy is the result of a medical condition – diabetes – but can be further induced by an unhealthy lifestyle...

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How Eye Disease Develops from Diabetes

Friday, May 17 2013 - 0 comments

People with diabetes are at higher risk of developing eye disease, such as diabetic retinopathy. The National Eye Institute estimates that 40 to 45 percent of all Americans with diabetes have some form of diabetic retinopathy . High blood glucose levels can cause the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina to swell, leak or even become blocked. As the blood vessels become blocked, the supply of blood and nourishment to the retina is cut off. This can result vision loss. To compensate, the retina may signal the body to produce more blood vessels, but these new vessels are fragile and can leak...

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What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Thursday, May 16 2013 - 0 comments

Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults 20 to 64 years of age. Diabetic retinopathy is a common eye disease in the back of the eye that causes blood vessels to swell, leak fluid or close off completely. With diabetic retinopathy, abnormal new blood vessels can also grow on the surface of the retina. Because diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness, early detection of the condition is vital. The National Eye Institute estimates that 40 to 45 percent of all Americans with diabetes have some form of diabetic retinopathy. The incidence of diabetic retinopathy is typically associated with...

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Higher Standards Mean Better Service

Tuesday, April 19 2011 - 0 comments

When searching for quality eye care, remember that it is important for the whole staff to be highly qualified and well trained. If you are looking into LASIK surgery, it isn’t just enough to make sure that the surgeon is well-qualified , but everyone at the clinic. At Key-Whitman, all technicians are required to become Certified Ophthalmic Assistants within a year of service. Making this a requirement rather than an optional certification is our way of assuring that everyone on our staff is held to the highest standards and is committed to providing you with the best service possible. To...

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Eye Health: The Connection Between Diabetes and Eye Disease

Tuesday, April 19 2011 - 0 comments

Did you know that one of the leading causes of blindness in adults aged 20-74 is Diabetes? As a diabetic, paying close attention to your eyesight is crucial, and regular eye exams can help prevent or detect problems early before irreversible blindness occurs. When you have diabetes, eye health should be a top concern. The threat of eye disease and changes in vision grow when your blood sugar becomes too high for your body to regulate. High blood sugar causes the lenses of the eye to swell, which can inhibit clear vision. The swelling of the eye lenses may take days, or even months to control your...

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